Vaccinations are an important part of protecting your children from all kinds of diseases from Chickenpox to Tuberculosis. Most vaccines are given in the first year of life, but some, require booster shots in later years and others, like the HPV vaccine, aren’t recommended until later in adolescence. In this blog, we’ll cover the HPV vaccine and the Center for Disease Control’s recently released updated recommendations.

What is the HPV Vaccine?

The HPV vaccine prevents cancer related to the Human Papilomavirus, or HPV. The virus is extremely common. In fact, the majority of sexually active people without the vaccine will contract HPV at some point in their lives. The virus isn’t typically serious, but is some cases can cause cancer. Each year, there are more than 25,000 new cases of cancer related to HPV that can be prevented with this vaccine.

Who should get the HPV Vaccine?

The CDC recommends that all preteens at age 11 or 12 be vaccinated before becoming sexually active. Men and women can get the vaccine until the age of 27, but preteens have been shown to have a better immune response to the vaccine.

The HPV Vaccine For Girls

The HPV virus can cause genital warts and oral, throat, anal, cervical, vaginal and vulvar cancers in women. Approximately 91% of cervical cancer is attributed to the virus. The vaccine is very effective at preventing HPV infections. Clinical trials have found that the vaccine is nearly 100% effective at preventing cervical cancer.

The CDC recommends two doses of the HPV Vaccine with the 2nd dose given 6-12 month after the first.

The HPV Vaccine For Boys

The HPV virus can cause genital warts and oral, throat, anal, and penile cancers in men. Unlike annual pap smear screenings for women, men are not monitored for early signs of cancer. The HPV vaccine has been shown to be effective at preventing HPV infections and is just as important for boys as it is for girls.

The CDC recommends two doses of the HPV Vaccine with the 2nd dose given 6-12 month after the first.

HPV Vaccine Side Effects

The HPV Vaccine is very safe, effective, and saves lives. It has been thoroughly and carefully studied by the Food and Drug Administration and the Center for Disease Control.

Some mild side effect may occur after injection including:

  • Pain/redness at the injection site
  • Mild fever
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea

To learn more about the HPV vaccine or to schedule an appointment for your child, contact us at Woodburn Pediatrics.